A Possible Government Shutdown

US+Capitol+Building

US Capitol Building

Shreya Madan, Reporter

The possibility of a government shutdown on October 1st has many people concerned with a multitude of opinions on the subject. Government shutdowns occur when Congress fails to pass legislation to fund the federal government by the end of the fiscal year. This legislation comes in the form of 12 appropriation bills that fund the full range of government agencies. Some are hopeful and believe a government shutdown will not occur.

“I hope the government doesn’t shut down. I believe that even though there’s all this partisan division that there are enough reasonable people who will see past it and understand that maintaining funding for obligations that the government has already accepted is counterproductive will hurt our national standing, our credit rating, and a lot of innocent people,” said Mrs. Sprenger (history teacher).

Predictions can also be made based on previous trends.

“I don’t know for sure; I would typically say probably not because it seems like this happens every two to four years. We have to raise the debt ceiling to do something, and which ever party is not in power says we’re going to hold it up but then magically at the last hour they all realize the benefits of trying to compromise and work on it. So, I hope it doesn’t, I hope they can figure out a deal, so they don’t have to go into a government shutdown and we still have a couple months,” explained Mr. Teague (history teacher).

The possibility of a government shutdown doesn’t paint American politics in a good light and shows that some changes to the way Congress runs are needed.

“The possibility of a government shutdown is a bad idea. I don’t think its good politics and I don’t think its good national policy. I think we’re doing this over and over and it demonstrates that some reforms about the way congress moves forward are needed,” mentioned Mrs. Sprenger.

The effects of a government shutdown go a long way especially when it comes to ordinary citizens.

“I think it’s unnecessary, especially now when it’s a party issue type of deal. From my understanding of it is it’s a very partisan issue, they’re not going to do it because it’s what the other side wants to do. The same thing happened under the Trump administration. One side is saying they’re not going to do it this way but it’s going to affect policies that they put into place that won’t get funding. I really do hope it doesn’t shutdown. When I was in my teen years, I can’t remember exactly how old I was but somewhere between 10 and 16 there was a similar situation; they had a government shutdown for a couple weeks and it effected my family pretty solid. My mom worked at the VA as a nurse when the government shutdown, so it affected her pay and so on. They still expected those people to go to work and I think after a couple weeks it worked out but it’s still wrong and unneeded. I could care less about how it effects politicians but when something like that does happen like whether it’s the Republicans or Democrats doing it, they’re going to end up hurting their people in the long run. It’ll effect government employees that don’t get pay checks on certain things or they have to cut back or fire people. That’s what’s really terrible in any of it, that it hurts the people that don’t really make those decisions,” said Mr. Teague.

When it comes to specifically effecting teachers, many different factors come into play.

“Since I don’t work for the federal government it takes a while for the ripple to reach me and in times of previous government shutdowns, I’ve never been particularly impacted. Probably the most likely thing would be if I was going on vacation because that could conceivably impact TSA agents, air traffic controllers, taxation, and the national parks close, you know, so those are things but ultimately, I think it would hurt all of us because it would have bad impact on the economy,” shared Mrs. Sprenger.

Public schools get a lot of their funding from the government which could lead to major problems if there is a shut down.

“It depends on how big the shutdown is and then how massive and extensive things are. I mean ultimately it could mean cutting government funding for programs and stuff like that and that’s where public schools, especially, get a ton of their money. Yes, we do get money from state funds, but we also get money from the government each year to help pay out salaries and it’ll definitely impact me that way. I think everyone would see it on a larger level because there’s things that impact stuff that would involve shipping, fuel distribution, etc. It probably would affect us all but hopefully it won’t get to that level,” explained Mr. Teague.

The government shutdown is an unwanted possibility showing the need for stronger preventative measures. The shutdown effects government employees and puts unnecessary consequences on aspects of regular peoples’ lives. Most are leaning towards the prediction that it won’t occur since compromise usually takes place before the deadline.